Kohoma

This is your About Page. It's a great opportunity to give a full background on who you are, what you do, and what your website has to offer. Double click on the text box to start editing your content and make sure to add all the relevant details you want to share with site visitors.

Komaha.jpeg

Artist Presentation

For the presentation, 

I ask some questions and you can please write whatever you want to share, and don´t focus on my question!

 

You told before you are in Lviv now,

You had to escape and lost your home, work and friends.

and now you have to live as a refugee. The only thing left now is my art.

 

We also talked little bit of the rules we create as artist, for art and in life.

And you tell me the first thing you bought for your earned money was paint.

 

Can you tell me little bit of your current situation. 

What have become very important now in your life?

 

and how was life before 24th Feb? 

What was important for you then?

 

You are from Mykolaiv, close to city Kherson in South of Ukraine, now Russia occupied this region.

And then you had to leave, when and how did it happen for you?

 

You said to me I don´t want to run anymore.

Is it possible to plan anything now, and where do you turn for hope?

Escape get a double meaning, you already escaped once but now I imagine all desicions the unmade to, must feel fated? 

 

 

I hope to meet you soon, either when Ukraine win the war or on a artist residency somewhere in Europe.

And until then I wish you to escape the war like a golden la cocharacha.

May a power higher than us be with you.

 

Warm regards, 

Theresa

Dear Theresa
I am touched to the core by your words about my art, for years I found no support and no response to what I was doing. And now more than ever I know that I should continue as long as I hear voices like yours. Art to me is something ethereal, something that is bigger than the human being himself, but at the same time - it is contained within us. I'm always searching, but not for answers, I'll never find them. For me, it's about the journey, not the goal.

  
For the moment I am safe in Lviv. And not going back to the capital or my hometown in the south - I just can't. The war undermined all my foundations, turned my life upside down, stripped it down and left me in the middle of the road. As I mentioned earlier, the only thing that cannot be taken away from me is my art. It ignited something inside me when everything went out. The fact is that there is a war going on not only in the country but also inside each of us - we don't know how to go on living and what to do next. I talk to myself and people through my paintings, painting is my language, intimate, complex, incredibly beautiful and moving. I'm finally feeling life coming back. I think I've experienced the peak of this waking nightmare. I feel like I really want to live now, once you almost lose your life - you start to appreciate it, value your freedom, yourself and the ability to just breathe.
The most important thing for me now is to build the foundations for a new life and let go of the past, no matter how good it was. 

It's hard to plan anything while a war is going on - it takes away guarantees and keeps you perplexed. Until it is over, life will only seem like an imitation of life. And I certainly don't want to run anymore, I may have to - that's true, but I want to stay in my homeland. When I lost my home in my native Mykolaiv and  Kyiv  , which was the beginning of my full life, where I was free, the whole country became my home, everywhere and nowhere - I am not my own, but home, as strange as it may sound. I look for hope and support in myself. No matter what happens I will always have myself.

For two years before the war I lived in the capital, I escaped to Kyiv by going to university in order to have my first attachment to that city. It was there that I first called myself happy, and I am very careful with that word and do not say it for nothing. Of course it was hard, I was 17, then 18, but I found a home, friends, a job that I liked so much, started to understand myself and what I was worth. And in an instant all that was taken away from you, the morning of February 24th divided my life into before and after and threw me into a maelstrom of misunderstanding, pain and hopelessness. I wasn't scared, I heard explosions, I saw rockets and destruction, I was so close to it, but the only thing I could feel was pain.  Letting go of the past is hard, especially when it is burning in ruins. I won't go back to my old self the same way I won't go back to the very places where my childhood passed, but the point is that I am still there and it is in my hands to build something new. I will forever mourn what I lost, what was so cruelly taken away not only from me but from all Ukrainians. But we will live.

About the memories of the beginning of the war. 
On the evening of February 23rd, I was alone in my rented flat, my roommates were out, and for some reason I sat by the window and smoked anxiously, as if anticipating something. I didn't understand where the feeling was coming from, so I went to bed, blaming it on fatigue. I woke up at 8 a.m. I didn't hear any sirens, but I saw dozens of missed calls on my phone. And at that moment I realised that the war had started, and then the silence inside. Selective memory maybe - I'm trying to forget that. The first one to call was my mother, picking up the phone I heard her crying, "It's really started, they bombed the airport this morning, it's so scary". I cried with her. From then on, my family lived for another two months in Mykolaiv, which was bombarded every day. Then they had to leave their apartments and go to Vinnitsa, where they are safe to this day. 
Together with my roommate we left the flat and went to the left bank of Kyiv to wait out the first two weeks there. I will never forget the empty eyes of the people in the subway that morning, suitcases in their hands, it was so quiet just to hear the underground train roaring. 
("the eyes of people in the underground on the morning of February 24" - writing these words makes me think of a new painting, inspiration is so unpredictable).

Text from UA art world (of course you can use these words)


"Art is not supposed to be beautiful, it supposed to make you feel something".
The artist was born in southern Ukraine, in Mykolaiv, where Komaha began his artistic journey. "For me, drawing is a personal, intimate language that I am still learning and making sure that my paintings are more eloquent than I am." Koma depicts the human body, nature inspired by the native landscapes of the south, combining the conscious and the imaginary. "Sometimes I would like to say that my paintings are not painted in oil but in feelings, each canvas captures my emotions, the pictures are a kind of chronicle of my life and everyone can read them if they allow themselves." The artist has never received an academic education and says he learned to draw by himself. "I don't believe in talent, my only 'talent' is my thirst for the craft, my sincere desire to continue to paint and seek myself in art." 
 

I am indescribably glad to know, communicate and collaborate with you. Thank you for your questions and your interest in me!

Contact

To purchase an artwork

contact artist directly on

@k0maha Instagram 

  • Instagram

UA World art fund